Showing posts with label amusement. Show all posts
Showing posts with label amusement. Show all posts

Friday, December 4, 2015

Pooh's Park, Tinsley's, and Others Replaced by a Shopping Center

View of the center today


Once again, we come back to one of our blog, this time to roll a few smaller posts into a bigger one. As the picture above shows, the area at Holleman and Texas Avenue is now a large (kind of low end) shopping center. In addition to covering all the changes that went on there (which I have yet to do), I can combine a few older posts into this one. So, first, we have Pooh's Park at 1907 Texas Avenue South.


There's far more to Pooh's Park (no, not related to the "Winnie" one) I can get into today, because it's a popular topic on local nostalgia threads: if you want to learn more, you can head over to Facebook to talk or browse through old photos (and they include newspaper articles!)

I never got to experience Pooh's Park myself, but from what I've seen and read, it was like Chuck E. Cheese, Putt-Putt, and a skating rink (roller, not ice) all wrapped into one. It opened in 1972 and was where the shopping center where Hobby Lobby, Big Lots, and Ross are now. I would like to say that Pooh's Park remained open until it became too valuable to remain (and was getting run-down anyway) and closed in the early 2000s, but no, that's not the case (it is very similar to a certain defunct theme park that closed about a decade ago, though). It closed in by 1989 (at that point, the phone book no longer lists it) and only the sign remained up (with the logo of the yellow dog they had, and not the one pictured above, and the name gone) until around the time they built the shopping center in the early 2000s, and then remained up until a little while afterward.

A 1984 phone book has a different ad that does mention things like a water slide (408 feet) and a different address (at some point, they changed to 105 Holleman, though based on what you can see from Google Earth, and backed up by a picture of Texas Avenue from a local history book I don't have a copy of with me) is that Pooh's Park was accessed through Texas Avenue, not Holleman.

Google Earth 1995, with modern streets overlaid


Some older maps (circa 2001-ish, long after Pooh's Park bit the dust) put a "Pooh's Lane" roughly where the Bahama Buck's is now, but unless that first part of Holleman Drive East was actually called that (after all, there's a few things that do support that, including the odd alignment of Holleman Drive and Holleman Drive East suggests that the East part was first, and then Holleman Drive extended that way later by way of a particularly awkward curve, or the fact that the subdivision nearby (behind the strip center and the other businesses on the east side) is named Pooh's Park Subdivision.

Sharing the address with Pooh's Park (at least the original address) was one "Furniture Liquidation Mart" which closed in October 1985 (The Eagle), and I would guess that this is what Bahama Buck's replaced (it used to be the foundations of another building). It should be noted, though, my 1984 phone book doesn't list it.

Near Pooh's Park was Tinsley's Chicken 'n Rolls.

Chicken done well, chicken well done!

Opening in late 1979, Tinsley's was located on 1905 Texas Avenue but was closed by 1989 after the Tinsley family sold out to Church's, which would eventually close or convert the restaurants (I don't think this restaurant was ever converted). Later, it was Kokopelli's (by 1998), and soon after, the Clay Oven (by 1999), a quick-serve (cheap!) Indian restaurant. This location, unfortunately, was razed for the shopping center, but Clay Oven was already closed by then. I have no actual pictures of what the building looked like in reality, nor do I remember Clay Oven being there at all. Sad, isn't it?

The plane was a real thing, though, David Tinsley used an actual 1930s plane to promote his restaurants, not unlike how Flying Tomato used hot air balloons.

While the "Boss Bird" made a brief appearance in Huntsville (after a long period of total absence), it is now closed (now a Hartz Chicken Buffet). It wasn't particularly to die for (although I think the "dried out chicken" complaints were an over-exaggeration, at least from what I saw in my visit).

There were a few other places on Holleman that later disappeared beyond Jot 59 (see picture), though one of them was a quick-lube auto place (name escapes me).

So anyway, all that was torn down for the shopping center (University Shopping Center, the name of which wasn't promoted), which opened around 2003 (after the H-E-B, I remember), with many of the stores it has today (Hobby Lobby, Shoe Carnival, Ross Dress for Less, Petco). Hobby Lobby moved from their old location at Post Oak Square, with the others being new. There was a branch of Loupot's, CiCi's (which came a few years later, as the old Culpepper Plaza was partially demolished), and a Goody's Family Clothing.

Goody's would close in early 2009 as the chain went under, but it was replaced with a few new stores, Big Lots (returning back to the market, as by that time, their old location at the former Kmart had been closed for several years) and a Twin Liquors (which, despite slightly nicer décor, seemed like a smaller, inferior competitor to Spec's).

Another shopping strip was built around the same time as the rest (but named The Shops at Wolf Pen Plaza) with Starbucks Coffee, a Sprint store (which initially had the older logo), and Champion Firearms (moved from the Kroger shopping center).

Saturday, June 14, 2014

North of University Drive and South of Bryan

Is this intersection even recognizable anymore?


I decided to separate this from the main Texas Avenue article (as parts of that are looking hairy itself, mostly in dealing with massive walls of text) partially because the area has been changed so much. I was having a bit of trouble in formatting this post, as the area has changed over the past 30-40 years significantly (with the lots being redrawn, even). This is not filler, this is some pretty cool stuff featuring some ads from the past, and a lot of other information. Enjoy.

This page is also intended to complement this page.

EXISTING STRUCTURES, WEST SIDE

Northpoint Crossing we will not cover, even though it's the biggest thing University and Texas has going for it. I know, just bear with me here.

• Hampton Inn was built in the mid to late 1980s. It retains its original exterior, is at 320 Texas Avenue, four stories, decent reviews. It's nothing too memorable, and photos are relatively commonplace.

Official picture from the owner. Notice the Applebee's in the background.


• Home2 Suites by Hilton is the newest thing along Texas Avenue. It's part of the current "hotel boom" and isn't open yet. I don't have photos either. It takes up some old apartments and also the old car wash (see next section).

• Applebee's was built in 1994 according to Brazos CAD. It's at 200 Texas Avenue.

• Knights Inn (104 Texas Avenue) isn't a great hotel today--it had a bit of charm with its uncommon-for-this-town evergreen trees (pine, looks like), but the reviews indicate that it's a dark, dank, nasty place that's rarely cleaned (or cleaned poorly), and in a bad neighborhood. This isn't an entirely unfounded accusation for that last one, because of its proximity to the scruffy apartments behind it, it put up a row of chain link fence blocking access from Meadowland Street (thankfully, aforementioned scruffy "Meadowlands Apartments" seem to be mostly cleared out--mostly). In the early 2000s (up to 2005, it seems), it was Kiva Inn and before that, a Comfort Inn (note that the name had been there before they built the Comfort Suites further down University), and before that, the Texian Inn. Texian Inn opened in 1984 (again, according to Brazos CAD).

DEFUNCT STRUCTURES, WEST SIDE

• Like Northpoint Crossing, a notable "missing building" is the building later known as the Plaza Hotel, which once was a Ramada Inn and later, student dorms entirely for a time. You can read more about the hotel here from this post two years ago. [EDIT 6-18-14: And not to forget the Chevron station either. That was originally a Gulf station, at the northwest corner of Texas and University. Read that here]

• Where the Hampton Inn is now was once the Sands Motel (and the same property plat, as I found out later). I have a good picture of the Sands, and that picture showed it was a "Best Western", back when it was a designation, not a brand. The Sands was razed in the early 1980s. Since the Hampton now occupies the pad, it may have had the same address, but it was 324 Texas Avenue.

• I used to be not sure what this thing north of the Hampton/Sands is. It was definitely there in 1982. In looking at directories, it said this was 300 Texas Avenue, Travel Kleen Car Wash. "But Pseudo3D...or whatever your name is...wasn't Travel Kleen over near Harvey Road, where they built that new strip center?" Yes it was. But my 1982 directory shows that Travel Kleen not there in 1982, and looking at the layout of the building, "self-serve car wash" is the only thing that makes sense in context. Mystery solved!

• Joe Faulks Auto Parts was the thing just north of that. It was open in 1980 (but not '83), and had the address of 208 Texas Avenue. Other than that, I have no info there. It may have also had 206 Texas Avenue.

• Western Motel was there at 204 Texas Avenue. This was another forgettable motel of which there are no decent photos or good ads. It was built in the early 1960s and demolished in the early 1990s. Unknown to when it shut down.

• Where the Texian Inn (now Knights Inn) operates was once a mini-golf course (and good, from what I heard, including the near-ubiquitous windmill). This was the Turf Green Miniature Golf Course (120 Texas Avenue). Turf Green (built in the early 1960s) that sadly I don't have a lot of information on (write in the comments?) but west of that (behind it) was an even more obscure "Western theme park" behind it, Jubilee Junction, opened by Marion Pugh himself. This opened in 1967 but it closed just about one year later in 1968, briefly home to a campaign rally for Texas governor hopeful Paul Eggers in 1970 and a few other events. Jubilee Junction had some 21 structures and featured a variety of displays (including live birds and animals), places to buy food & drink (such as soft drinks at a salvaged saloon bar) and some authentic pieces scattered around the village (Keeny TX's old post office). You could get a souvenir artisan horseshoe from the blacksmith, ride in a covered wagon around the village, or watch a mock gunfight, staged twice a day.

While it certainly sounded unique and interesting, it does sound like the model was flawed, and not enough a big enough trade area to keep it going year after year. That's not an uncommon fate among these types of things, and bigger failures have happened since (like AutoWorld in Michigan). Anyway, Jubilee Junction ultimately turned out to be a bust. By the end of the 1970s, it was completely gone.

Picture courtesy John Ellisor. Used with permission.


• I'm not forgetting the "Snowflake Donuts" building either. That you can read here. It also needs some tenants it's missing.

EXISTING STRUCTURES, EAST SIDE

• At the northeast center of this intersection (University and Texas), is an Exxon, which was built in 1993. This is at 425 Texas Avenue. There is nothing remarkable about it.

413 Texas Avenue is an insurance office. It's also a small, somewhat ugly building, but take a close look at it. Some of you may be old enough to remember it as a Pizza Inn in the late 1960s (Brazos CAD says it was built in 1966) to sometime in the mid-1980s. The building still looks remarkably similar to the ad below. Pizza Inn itself has shrank in recent years, but you can still find it in a few corners of the world not too far away from here (a modern Rattler's gas station en route to Temple has a new location, and one is near Northwest Mall in Houston).

1970s phone book.


411 Texas Avenue was Tokyo Steak House in 1980. The building was built in 1966, but I can't find anything for what it was in the beginning, and the results for Tokyo Steak House indicate that in the mid-1970s (1976, looks like) it started over in Townshire and later came here. It was a bank in the late 1980s, records indicate, though nothing's listed under the Banks in the 1989 yellow pages for this address. Interestingly, it was a bank before becoming a restaurant (1978 directory has "The Last National Bank" here at this address) [EDIT 10/21/15: I think that was actually a supposed to be a joke, and it was really a restaurant.]

1984 phone book


• You can get your fried food fix at the Sonic at 401 Texas Avenue, which was built around late 2004 or early 2005 and replaced an old Sonic at University Drive East (redeveloped in 2007 and now a Brake Check). This was a vacant lot prior to that (at least to 1995), but it wasn't always vacant...

301 Texas Avenue is a Super 8 Motel.

4613 Texas Avenue is a Fairfield Inn & Suites.


DEMOLISHED STRUCTURES, EAST SIDE
• The Shell at the corner of Texas and FM 60 was a Shell up until the early 1990s. You can see a shot of the smaller Shell (logo) sign here (annotated version by AggiePhil) but there was a larger one, too (see the Texas Avenue page). This gem comes from TexAgs, and I have yet to find a picture for this, because that would be hilarious. I have also yet to find an address for this one.

In the late '80s or early '90s, that Shell station had a giant S H E L L sign. One night the S burned out. Someone took a picture of the intersection and the "H E L L" sign and sent it to the Daily Texan, who ran it with the headline, "Welcome to College Station."


• The current home of Sonic at 401 Texas Avenue was "Darby's Foreign Car Parts" in 1978 and 1980 (these two years are not indicative of when it was built, but it was open in this era). I'm not sure when this was demolished, but it was the late 1980s or early 1980s. It also did business as "Enginooity Import Parts & Repair". Not sure which is the "official" one (but Enginooity still operates in Bryan even to this day, apparently) [EDIT 6-21-14: Additionally, 401 Texas Avenue was ALSO the site of Cut Rate Liquor No. 5 concurrently]

301 Texas Avenue at the corner of Cooner and Texas was originally A-1 Auto Parts and then later became Aggie Solar Guard by the late 1980s, which ultimately became Ag Solar Guard in the 1990s as use of the word "Aggie" was cracked down on. It was then demolished, but not before ASG moved north.

315 Texas Avenue was Senter-Piece Flowers in the early 1980s just south of Tom's. This was also demolished for Super 8 eventually.

209 Texas Avenue: Tastee-Freez was here into the early 1970s. Tastee-Freez was at about 1,800 in the 1950s and 1960s but imploded as they couldn't control franchises. There's less than 50 today, so T-F's departure from Bryan should be expected. I can't find what happened to T-F's space later, but it was demolished eventually. The 1980s phone books list nothing for the address (1980 and 1983). I'm not exactly sure where it was.

4613 Texas Avenue was Tom's Barbecue (not "Steakhouse") yet, before it moved to Bryan. This moved in the late 1980s.

4611 Texas Avenue was A&W Drive-In, this also has no information for 1980 and 1983, which implies a restaurant was no longer here. I believe this was the one closer to the Bryan city limits. A&W did make a brief re-appearance in south (well, at the time) College Station when it opened in the Exxon at Rock Prairie, but that's a story for another day.

Wow, it had an eat-in area? That's better than Sonic ever had.


OTHER MYSTERIES
"Gary's Exxon" was supposedly at 408 Texas Avenue, but I can't find a place for it.

This information here was compiled with old directories and phone books, so please don't go ripping this wholeheartedly. Please write in the comments...

Friday, March 21, 2014

H-E-B Pantry / Gattitown / DSW

The store today (picture mine). The facade just keeps getting bigger and bigger...


H-E-B built its first store in College Station in 1991 (according to InSite Magazine), a time when they were expanding like wildfire across East Texas and Houston area with "H-E-B Pantry Foods". Unlike the full line H-E-B stores, the Pantry stores were small even by early 1990s standards (averaging 20k to 30k square feet) and lacked departments that other stores had, only with a meat counter, produce, and a very small collection (maybe one aisle) of non-food items like HBA (health & beauty aids) and pet items.

It had a facade that looked very similar to the picture below (this is from a shopping center in Houston, but as of spring 2013, the facade was repainted and replaced with a traditional H-E-B logo--I'm sure that the Pantry name has been totally extinct for the last five years or so now)


Unfortunately, since I have no pictures or even directories (I actually had two at one time, but I don't know what happened to them...if I find them, I'll tell you), I'll have to describe it. Instead of parking spaces in front of it like the other stores in the center, it had a large ramp in front of it for shoppers. Inside, it had mid-rising drop ceilings with a few random "Texas" graphics, such as a picture of a bunch of haybales scattered through a field. The produce was in the right side, there were ten check-out stands (with one being an express lane, 10 items or less), a photo developing kiosk, a "bakery" that didn't seem to make anything that fresh (fare was mostly limited to some tasteless bagels, the stuff that would be sold in the bread aisle today).

The three H-E-B Pantry stores in town (this one, and the two Bryan locations--were somewhat unusual, as at least from my knowledge, they didn't move into old stores, as in the Houston area, they were known to inhabit old stores like Safeway.

In 2002, this store closed and was replaced with the massive and modern store across Holleman.

That wasn't the end for the space, though in summer 2003, Gattiland closed its Bryan location and moved into the old Pantry Foods store within the month. Although I was getting too old to be part of the Gattitown demographic by the time it opened, I visited anyway, because it was new, and it was to be the latest in the technology. Gattitown totally rebuilt the facade (the Texas part remained visible from the back, but unless you lived in one of the apartments behind the complex, you could not see it) and removed the ramp in the parking lot, making it smooth. You also had to enter through the sides.

“When we built [the Bryan location] it was the second GattiLand we built,” Moffett said. “This is the latest generation, and it’s going to be more comfortable and fun for every age. From here on out, they’re all going to be GattiTowns.”

This is the sixth restaurant to open under the GattiTown name and “eatertainment” theme, and each is decorated to reflect its community, Moffett said. At the College Station restaurant, an Aggieland Dining Room will be lined with reproductions of Benjamin Knox paintings. The drink station is positioned beneath a mock water tower, and other rooms include a city hall and a mock movie theater.

The game room will occupy the entire back section of the restaurant, but Moffett said adults can find quiet dining areas in a corner cafe and the Library, which will have high-speed Internet connections and five iMac computers for customer use.

Moffett said he plans to hire a full-time marketing employee to promote the restaurant’s meeting space, which is free to use once customers buy a meal. There also are two meeting rooms set apart from the customer traffic flow, and some of the dining rooms have sliding walls that can divide them into smaller spaces.

The "mock water tower" was modeled after by-then defunct old water tower at the corner of Park Place and Texas Avenue, and as for the "Library", I never did find (employees didn't seem to know where it was, a sign of bad things to come), but it apparently did exist and was soon converted into another theater room. The midway area wasn't all that better than Gattiland, if anything, it seemed smaller. There wasn't even room for a playground. The old style tokens that Gattiland used was replaced by a card system.

Well, initially Gattitown was a huge success and the parking lot stayed packed every Friday and Saturday night. But as the years wore on, Gattitown started to get competition in the form of Chuck E. Cheese which opened at Post Oak Mall in 2005, and at Grand Central Station, which happened soon after. Chuck E. Cheese did the most damage to Gattitown, with Gattitown's knockoff formula competing with the original, and just like that, Gattitown slid downhill just like its predecessor. It was pretty much exclusively for kids (no classic arcades, or even alcohol) for that matter, and even then stayed pretty empty except for the "Kids Eat Free" nights. In July 2012, Gattitown closed. The pizza was now abysmal (not even fully cooked) and Mr. Gatti's left the area for good after nearly 40 years of jumping around town.

It wasn't the end of the space, though: in fall of 2013, it reopened as DSW (Designer Shoe Warehouse). Despite the fact that the facade of the old Gattitown/Pantry was completely covered up, the design restored the appearance of a retail store, so if you go inside and close your eyes you can almost remember how the Pantry used to be laid out.

2026 S. Texas Avenue

Editor's Note: Updated as of August 2015, Feb. 2016 update to correct date

Friday, February 14, 2014

Ardan Catalog Showroom / Rolling Thunder / Gattiland / Thunder Elite / Planet Fitness

The former Ardan/Gattiland/Thunder Elite (and current Planet Fitness) as it stands today.

This place in Bryan-College Station is best remembered (at least to me) as Gattiland, but the history of the building goes farther beyond that, and we'll start there instead.

One of the more deceptively popular webpages that have hung around for years is DISCOUNT STORES OF THE '60S, a part of "David P. Johnson's House O' Retro", specializing in really bad 90's webpage clichés. Well, most of them are from the Midwest with names that disappeared decades ago and have virtually no familiarity to anyone living in Texas. Well, almost. Around mid-way that first page, you'll see Ardan Catalog Showroom, which I originally believed we got in Bryan in the 1970s or late 1960s. According to a comment below, the Bryan store came in-line in 1980, which explains why the pre-1980s Newspapers.com showed nothing.

One of the ads Ardan ran locally, from November 1983. This, coincidentally, is a great example near the apex of when the video game industry crashed and retailers were forced to sell cartridges at low prices.


While I can't vouch for the name changes that the Des Moines branch experienced, nor can confirm or deny that this location featured a supermarket (update, it didn't), it did in fact exist in this location. Ardan Catalog Showroom went out of business at some point in the late 1980s, presumably 1986 since evidence backs that up.

Originally called "Ardan Crossing Plaza" (which shows that the Travis Landing name didn't come in until after Ardan Catalog Showroom bit the dust), but based on the references (or lack thereof) to University Square, I'm not even sure anymore.


Ardan Catalog Showroom ad from 1985. Note the new logo, and that Des Moines isn't listed.


By 1989 and heading into the early 1990s, the space (or at least part of it) became Rolling Thunder Skating Rink, a roller skating rink that lasted for a few years, and now we return to our story that began with Mr. Gatti's on Northgate, the opening of Gattiland in '96. I don't believe the rest of the old Ardan Catalog Showroom was EVER utilized again. Some small tenants in the east part of the old store probably did come and go, but Gattiland did not cover the whole area.

Gattiland was the place to have fun/birthday parties/etc. (as Pooh's Park was dead and gone by this time, leaving little but the sign) for anyone growing up in College Station between the late 1990s and early 2000s. Oh yes, it was definitely something: there was a large buffet and a regular eating area, the party rooms, a large room that showed Cartoon Network on a projection TV (remember, this was Cartoon Network of the late 1990s, which is still spoken of very highly), and the "Midway", which had the prize booth right as you went in. To the back was the bumper cars and a huge McDonald's Playplace-type playground, only larger (with one of those things you could grab and push off and it would slide down the metal rail: I don't know what it's called). There was also air hockey and tons of games, both redemption type games and arcade games (including several linked Daytona USA arcades). Unfortunately, I don't have any photos of the inside but I can remember most of it on the inside and could probably describe parts of it to you if asked nicely (it was the purple bumper car that was put in storage in the later years, for example).

Well, it got really run down pretty quickly, and I remember hearing around in 2000 or so (at the time, of course) some hoodlums coming in one day and damaged a bunch of machines (some of them never worked quite right after that). By the time it moved, the playground was dismantled and a bunch of stuff didn't work. In 2003 it moved to College Station and renamed to Gattitown (which will continue here). The building sat vacant, became "Thunder Elite", a kids gymnastics/cheerleading place for a while, too, though it eventually packed up and left as well (new location).

Google Street View

In mid-2014, the former Gattiland/Thunder Elite space became Planet Fitness, which prohibits grunting. It also gave part of the facade a purple paint job which didn't match the rest of the plaza.

So that's it for Gattiland, Ardan Catalog Showroom, and the like. Pictures are welcome, you know...

1673 Briarcrest

Monday, July 9, 2012

Grand Station Entertainment / Wolf Pen Bowling / Lowe's

Any College Station resident knows that until circa 2010, we only had Home Depot in terms of big-box store choices.

"Spring Creek Village" at William D. Fitch currently features a Lowe's, Chick-fil-A, and Whataburger, wraps around a gas station with an empty restaurant pad. Great to learn that College Station finally has its first Lowe's, after Bryan having one for years and years.

We did have one, though, in the distant past. As it turns out, we did get a Lowe's back in the mid-1980s, on the bypass. It was much different than the Lowe's of today, much smaller and featuring slightly more departments before streamlining (like electronics!) but it didn't do so well, and closed circa 1989 before being renovated into Wolf Pen Bowl & Skate, which featured a large skating rink (roller, not ice), a snack bar, PowerSports Gymnastics (which was fairly large and did have a small upper level viewing area). Unfortunately, I have no pictures, save for the ad below. It seems based on the ad that they sub-leased the space, and I recall hearing that after it closed it was used as storage space.


I remember going to PowerSports Gymnastics in the early 2000s (later "Power Gymnastics" before finally disappearing in the mid-2000s) and the skating rink (sixth grade, maybe?), and of course, a bowling alley, which was slightly better than the MSC's but not by much. To think that both of the alleys came from the 1990s is beyond me, as by 1999, both were quite run-down. Sadly, I don't have pictures, but by 2007 it was acquired by a new owner. While this meant the loss of a different bowling alley in town (Triangle Bowl in Bryan, which was even worse, apparently, than the other two alleys) it meant that Wolf Pen Bowl & Skate would be renovated. The plan would be like "Boonville Station", a similar project planned in 2005 in Bryan but never got off the ground, and soon Wolf Pen Bowl & Skate closed and was gutted for a new bowling alley, an arcade (though the original Wolf Pen Skate had a few arcade games, I think), glow-in-the-dark mini-golf, an expanded eating area, and laser tag. This, of course, was Grand Station Entertainment, which remains today. It is often mistakenly called Grand Central Station, undoubtedly its namesake.

I don't know if the Wolf Pen Bowl built in front of the store (the aerial suggests the building was expanded to the front and the parking lot altered) or not, but one wonders if they had simply expanded. There's certainly enough space to.

2400 Earl Rudder Freeway

Friday, May 11, 2012

Putt-Putt Golf & Games

The building today


1705 Valley View Drive

The 1990s were a pretty sleepy time for College Station, and that was where I spent my youth. Many of these have been covered, but for mini-golf, it was Putt-Putt Golf. Located off Valley View and Harvey Mitchell, and opening circa 1988 (after the 1987 filing), Putt-Putt (no relation to the children's adventure game by Humongous Entertainment), was always pretty small (nothing too fancy, no windmills or exciting options, mostly green carpeting, beginner and less-beginner golf courses), some large fiberglass animals thrown around (giraffe, elephant: trying to with a vaguely "safari" theme), plus an arcade with tokens and prizes (it was really small--I don't even remember it having air conditioning or not, even as of circa 1999), a batting cage, and a small area for bumper boats, the only place in town for them. I later discovered that the establishment opened as a franchised location and taken over by the main company in 1991. The blurb that I found mentioned it had been expanded slightly, though I don't know what features they actually added.

While the bumper boats and mini-golf were unique, it was no Gattiland. If you wanted to have fun as a kid in those days or wanted a cool place to have a birthday, you went to Gattiland, case closed.


The logo. It's an edited version from Putt-Putt of Rome, Georgia, which did not update their logo, enabling me edit it for the purposes of this article.




Probably because of that fact (and everyone knew it), Putt-Putt just got sadder and more run-down over the years. The bumper boats went first, closing in the early 2000s (not that it was very big, I think it could only fit four), then the Putt-Putt name ("Brazos Valley Golf & Games" was the new name). By 2005, they had converted the bumper boats area to a skatepark, which seemed mildly popular. But by the end of 2006 (or early 2007--help me out here), the whole thing was closed, with only some tattered mini-golf holes, a creepy-looking abandoned batting cage, and those fiberglass animals, now fading in the sun.

Eventually the batting cage and mini-golf remnants were demolished, and the bumper boats area filled in for good for its new tenant: Paradise Scuba, which relocated from Parkway Square. They doubled the size of the old arcade building, even adding in a swimming pool inside (why they didn't use the old Bumper Boats area, who knows). They did, however, leave the lighthouse from the bumper boats area, though the lower rungs were removed so you couldn't climb up.



Paradise Scuba opened in September 2008 closed in June 2012 for good, despite the renovations to the property. Two years later, it reopened as a second location of Aggieland Cycling, which presumably filled in the pool inside. Neither business used the old batting cages area, and in late 2016, Domino's Pizza began to build a new location there (replacing their location on Texas Avenue near Deacon and Sunset Gardens), which opened in April 2017. Weirdly, the official "entrance" to the pizza restaurant is the far side of Aggieland Cycling's parking lot, the closer driveway (shared with Aggieland Cycling) is supposed to be an exit-only lane.

Going back to Putt-Putt, it lasted over a decade, but to this day, we don't have a real mini-golf place. Sure, Grand Station Entertainment, the only place for bowling (Triangle Bowl and the MSC met their demise around the time Putt-Putt closed up shop) or mini-golf (of the "glow in the dark" variety, and they've got some sort of weird Western theme going on. If you want to golf in College Station, you'll have to stick with real courses and driving ranges.

Extensively updated in July 2014 with new tenant and picture, then again in 2015. In October 2017, a number of later updates were integrated.